Sorb tree: Meaning & Use

The sorb tree also known as sorbus domestica is a species of the Rosaceae family which has been somewhat forgotten and is today quite rare.

3074Arbre13420%FRhttps://bocdn.ecotree.green/essence/0001/04/469e7a251a3e02506412e21ecce217ca48932bc7.jpegSorb treeSorb tree - Montplonne Forest (55) Montplonne Forest 55https://ecotree.green/en/offers/forest/montplonne-foresthttps://ecotree.green/en/offers/55-meuse/montplonne-forest/sorb-tree/3074
Sorb tree DKK 134
Age: 0 to 2 years old
Montplonne Forest
Meuse, Grand Est, France
4851Arbre13420%FRhttps://bocdn.ecotree.green/essence/0001/04/469e7a251a3e02506412e21ecce217ca48932bc7.jpegSorb treeSorb tree - Montplonne Forest (55) Montplonne Forest 55https://ecotree.green/en/offers/forest/montplonne-foresthttps://ecotree.green/en/offers/55-meuse/montplonne-forest/sorb-tree/4851
Sorb tree DKK 134
Age: 0 to 2 years old
Montplonne Forest
Meuse, Grand Est, France
4949Arbre13420%FRhttps://bocdn.ecotree.green/essence/0001/04/469e7a251a3e02506412e21ecce217ca48932bc7.jpegSorb treeSorb tree - Montplonne Forest (55) Montplonne Forest 55https://ecotree.green/en/offers/forest/montplonne-foresthttps://ecotree.green/en/offers/55-meuse/montplonne-forest/sorb-tree/4949
Sorb tree DKK 134
Age: 0 to 2 years old
Montplonne Forest
Meuse, Grand Est, France
4948Arbre13420%FRhttps://bocdn.ecotree.green/essence/0001/04/469e7a251a3e02506412e21ecce217ca48932bc7.jpegSorb treeSorb tree - Montplonne Forest (55) Montplonne Forest 55https://ecotree.green/en/offers/forest/montplonne-foresthttps://ecotree.green/en/offers/55-meuse/montplonne-forest/sorb-tree/4948
Sorb tree DKK 134
Age: 0 to 2 years old
Montplonne Forest
Meuse, Grand Est, France

Sorb tree

A post-pioneer species, the sorb tree, or Sorbus domestica, is found mainly in Europe, south-west Asia and north-west Africa. The sorb tree originally grew all around the Mediterranean and was dispersed to the rest of Europe during the Roman Empire.

Why does EcoTree plant sorb trees?

Sorb trees are planted to form defensive hedges, as the thorny branches of these trees are a deterrent to birds. Birds might be attracted by the fruit, but it is too acidic for them. What's more, corm trees are hardy trees that can grow in difficult conditions, such as poor soil. From an ecological point of view, sorb trees can be valuable to local wildlife, providing shelter and perches for birds, as well as habitats for many insects. Their fruit, although inedible for humans, can be a source of food for small mammals and birds.

Sorb tree - Overview

Sorb tree - Overview

It is a tree that bears fruit in its southern biotope, which is a biological environment with homogeneous living conditions. The sorb tree is a species that hardly exceeds 10 to 12 m in height and a trunk diameter of 30 to 45 cm. However, as it climbs higher up into the more humid regions, with their richer soils, its circumference doubles and, in the forest, it can just about match the largest trees. It is a tree with orange-brown bark, which resembles that of the oak. Its leaves are toothed only on the upper two-thirds and, in autumn, its dark green turns a beautiful golden-red. Its buds are large and slimy, and its white flowers are arranged in bouquets. Its fruits are green with reddish-brown spots when ripe, and can resemble small apples or pears. They are not edible for humans but are very popular with small mammals, especially badgers.
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Sorb tree

Sorb tree - Species requirements

The sorb tree has high light requirements (although it prefers light shade to full sun). It adapts everywhere, provided there is enough room. This fast-growing species is capable of developing a large crown. The sorb tree tolerates drought well, even on chalky soils, but is highly resistant to damp soils.

Wood from the Sorb Tree

Sorb Tree wood can be used for a variety of purposes. It is one of France's hardest indigenous woods. It has been prized for many years for making barrels, currying tools and tracing and measuring tools. This wood is also used in agroforestry to protect vines from the sun thanks to its light foliage or to encourage the development of truffles, as the horn releases carbon as it decomposes.

The symbol of Sorb Tree

The symbol of the sorb tree in fact the tree of life or giver of life. In ancient times, the berries of the corm tree were the food of the gods. It is a talisman against lightning and therefore against spells. The "witch's hand", used to uncover metals, was always made of wood from a sorb tree. A whip with a wood from a sorb tree handle was used to tame bewitched animals. Lambs had to pass through a sorb tree circle as soon as they were born, and a stick from a sorb tree was planted in the middle of pastures to protect flocks.